Tag Archives: Tulsa

Building Bridges

In 1820, ferry services began crossing the Pacific Ocean from Marin County to San Francisco Bay. By 1860, said services were operating on a set public schedule. The business was booming, but competition was fierce. The Sausalito Land and Ferry Company launched in 1867, and it because of it’s reliability and consistency, it took the vast majority of the business and eventually became known as the Golden Gate Ferry Company. By the 1920’s, it was the most prominent and profitable ferry company in the world.

And still, the demand was simply greater than could be met. The need for an even more efficient way to cross the bay arose, and it was met by one of the most architecturally ambitious projects to that date–builScreenshot (21)ding a nearly mile-long bridge to connect the two land masses. Many thought it couldn’t be done, but in 1937 the Golden Gate Bridge opened to the public, and since then it has been one of the most dazzling bridges in existence because it defied what seemed impossible. The iconic bridge encapsulates integrity, strength, and an American drive to defy the odds.

I didn’t realize how big of a deal this bridge was until lately. You see, my dear readers, I have a good friend who is in college learning to be an architect, and she recently finished a five-week long assignment of building a bridge model. She worked on it many more hours than should be humanly possible considering the schedule of a college student, but the end result wScreenshot (19)as simply one of the most delicate, breath-taking things I had ever seen in my life–a wooden small-scale model of what promises to be a stunning but functional bridge if ever build. A couple pictures of her work are attached. The only way I can describe it is by saying it looks unbelievable, like hand-crafting work of that precision and beauty should not be possible–a true work of art.

So maybe we aren’t all blessed with the ability to literally design, conceptualize, and create these beautiful bridges, but still we are capable of building our own bridges every day. A bridge is simply something that connects Point A to Point B and helps somebody move between the two, so I argue that we should all be doing that anyway, right? If we are at Point A, and we see our goals, dreams, and ambitions at Point B, how can we reach them?

It’s time to take this to another level, my friends. I started thinking about this even further, and this is what I concluded: There are two kinds of people in this regard: There are the watchers, Screenshot (20)people who are content to sit down in the grass of Point A, stare across the bay, and longingly watch Point B, gazing upon the happiness and prosperity that will never be known. Then there are the bridge-builders. These are the people that know where they stand and not only can see their dreams of a better future, but are also willing to build the bridge that will get them there. This means putting in work, practice, prayer, and anything else that will help realize those dreams. That’s how you build a bridge, even if you aren’t a striving architect. What kind of person are you? Will you emptily dream of a better tomorrow, or will you build the bridge that will get you there?

Build bridges, my friends.

— Jesse Haynes

Unlikely Success

I hope all is well, my dear readers,  and hopefully all of you got the newsletter I sent out yesterday. If you didn’t, we can easily fix that. Just enter your email into the “subscribe” box and you will be added to my mailing list. Sweet deal, right?

So anyways, let me get to the blogging part of this post. Have you ever been faced with some sort of confrontation that looked like odds of success were improbably, slim, or even nonexistent?  Maybe you are facing one of those situations right now even, I don’t know. If you have ever gone up against any kind of challenge like I just described, then I’m sure you know just how enormous the mountains of a challenge can feel when you are standing at their foot.

All of that being said, today I am writing about training my dog.

That was a joke. I do that quite often (or at least attempt to, sometimes they just aren’t funny). Anyways, today I want to brag for a moment on myself and a group of my friends. Being the first year Flagof college, and the social butterfly that I am (another joke), I signed up for co-ed flag football to have something to do and maybe make some new friends. The team I joined was not the most, um, likely team to succeed, I would say. The vast majority of the teams in our league are composed of male ex-football high school players and girls that are on other university sport squads (track, softball, soccer, etc.). Our team, eh… not so much. We do have some athletes, but the amount of prior football experience is limited, at best.  Nevertheless, with a lot of practice, a lot of scheming, and a considerable amount of luck, my team is playing in the semifinals tonight – one of the last four teams standing. Although we started out 0-2 (I missed the first two games with my ankle injury, but that probably didn’t make a huge difference) we have since strung together a winning streak that we are all very proud of. Nobody believed in us but ourselfs, and from that doubt stemmed unlikely success.

What can you take from this story, readers? Let me explain, if you haven’t already figured it out. When you are facing adversity – problems that look like there is no way on God’s green earth that they can be solved – don’t give up hope. Anything is possible, take a strategic approach in attacking them. How do you eat an elephant? One bite at a time, my friends. Work hard, pray harder, and keep pressing forward one step at a time, and then you can handle any problem thrown at you, too!

Have a good week, dear readers.

– Jesse Haynes