Building Bridges

In 1820, ferry services began crossing the Pacific Ocean from Marin County to San Francisco Bay. By 1860, said services were operating on a set public schedule. The business was booming, but competition was fierce. The Sausalito Land and Ferry Company launched in 1867, and it because of it’s reliability and consistency, it took the vast majority of the business and eventually became known as the Golden Gate Ferry Company. By the 1920’s, it was the most prominent and profitable ferry company in the world.

And still, the demand was simply greater than could be met. The need for an even more efficient way to cross the bay arose, and it was met by one of the most architecturally ambitious projects to that date–builScreenshot (21)ding a nearly mile-long bridge to connect the two land masses. Many thought it couldn’t be done, but in 1937 the Golden Gate Bridge opened to the public, and since then it has been one of the most dazzling bridges in existence because it defied what seemed impossible. The iconic bridge encapsulates integrity, strength, and an American drive to defy the odds.

I didn’t realize how big of a deal this bridge was until lately. You see, my dear readers, I have a good friend who is in college learning to be an architect, and she recently finished a five-week long assignment of building a bridge model. She worked on it many more hours than should be humanly possible considering the schedule of a college student, but the end result wScreenshot (19)as simply one of the most delicate, breath-taking things I had ever seen in my life–a wooden small-scale model of what promises to be a stunning but functional bridge if ever build. A couple pictures of her work are attached. The only way I can describe it is by saying it looks unbelievable, like hand-crafting work of that precision and beauty should not be possible–a true work of art.

So maybe we aren’t all blessed with the ability to literally design, conceptualize, and create these beautiful bridges, but still we are capable of building our own bridges every day. A bridge is simply something that connects Point A to Point B and helps somebody move between the two, so I argue that we should all be doing that anyway, right? If we are at Point A, and we see our goals, dreams, and ambitions at Point B, how can we reach them?

It’s time to take this to another level, my friends. I started thinking about this even further, and this is what I concluded: There are two kinds of people in this regard: There are the watchers, Screenshot (20)people who are content to sit down in the grass of Point A, stare across the bay, and longingly watch Point B, gazing upon the happiness and prosperity that will never be known. Then there are the bridge-builders. These are the people that know where they stand and not only can see their dreams of a better future, but are also willing to build the bridge that will get them there. This means putting in work, practice, prayer, and anything else that will help realize those dreams. That’s how you build a bridge, even if you aren’t a striving architect. What kind of person are you? Will you emptily dream of a better tomorrow, or will you build the bridge that will get you there?

Build bridges, my friends.

— Jesse Haynes

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